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Until that time comes…

Omitted from that mini list is another such moment that I cannot forget. I remember exactly where I was, what I was doing, what I was wearing, what I'd just finished eating, and who I was with the evening the George Zimmerman verdict came back. It had been a beautiful Saturday evening and I was in the North End, with a good good friend, having just eaten for my first time at a cool Italian restaurant, Antico Forno… Sigh. That's another moment many of us will never forget.





Today is the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Jr. You often hear folks who were alive on that day describe exactly where they were, what they were doing, wearing, saying, and smelling at the moment they learned of that national tragedy. We've had similar moments since, most all linked to tragedy: the Challenger disaster - tragedy, 9/11/01 - tragedy, when Barack Obama won in 2008 - awesomeness, Newtown, CT, and for me and many others April 15, 2013, the Boston Marathon bombing. I'd written a piece about that day called What a Day. I hope I can find a rough version to post here.

Omitted from that mini list is another such moment that I cannot forget. I remember exactly where I was, what I was doing, what I was wearing, what I'd just finished eating, and who I was with the evening the George Zimmerman verdict came back. It had been a beautiful Saturday evening and I was in the North End, with a good good friend, having just eaten for my first time at a cool Italian restaurant, Antico Forno… Sigh. That's another moment many of us will never forget.


You never quite know when another such moment is coming and I had another such moment this week. I don't know if this moment will be shared by as many folks as the aforementioned moments, but I imagine this moment will be shared by some. You see, George Zimmerman was arrested this past Monday and is now facing a felony weapons charge, amongst other charges, for pointing a gun at his girlfriend with whom he lived.


One point I wish to make clear: he was immediately arrested and charged with a felony for pointing a gun at his girlfriend. Remember that back on February 26, 2012 the same George Zimmerman was released the same evening he admitted to shooting and killing a Trayvon Martin, an unarmed child, who was walking home through Trayvon's own neighborhood. George Zimmerman was not arrested for 46 days.


I'd like to believe I'd remember this moment no matter what. But what made that particular moment, this latest incident, even more historically significant for me is that I was hearing this news as breaking news. It was provided by Martin family attorney Benjamin Crump. I sat in his presence along with Ms. Sybrina Fulton (Trayvon's mom), Mr. Jahvaris Martin (Trayvon's brother), Attorney Daryl Parks, Harvard Law Professor Charles Ogletree, and many others. We were brought together at a Charles Hamilton Houston Trayvon Martin Symposium hosted by the Harvard Law School entitled Checking under the hood: defining Trayvon Martin's legacy, from conversation to legislation.


The symposium will continue to take place throughout the country, and quite possibly the world; because as the the amazing and poised and graceful and so so strong Ms. Sybrina Fulton said to attorneys Crump and Parks immediately following the verdict in the George Zimmerman case, "We won't let this verdict determine Trayvon's legacy. We will define Trayvon's legacy."

Once again I have lots of notes. Should anyone which to see them, please send me a message.

As a conclusion, it's worth mentioning in spite of the Jonathan Ferrell and Renisha McBride incidents, I have to feel hopeful. I just have to be:


At the UVM Women's Summit last week, Dr. Angela Y. Davis spoke about the catalyst for change that was the collective optimism during the Civil Rights Movement. To paraphrase her words there was a certainty in folks hearts and minds that a change was gonna come.


This past Monday, attorneys Crump and Parks shared many reasons for legal and political hope based on what is occurring legislatively with regards to Stand Your Ground laws in Florida and beyond. At the Million Hoodie March in March 2012, Ms. Fulton said "My son was not committing any crimes. Our son is your son ... It's not about [a] black-and-white thing; it's just about a right-and-wrong thing." I'd like to believe that as people truly begin to internalize the comments made by Ms. Fulton that there is hope socially as well. Until that time comes...



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About Me

tamia rashima jordan, M.Ed., channels her energy into projects that heal the BIPOC (Black & Indigenous & People of Color) community including serving on the Community Council of the Massachusetts Coalition to Prevent Gun Violence, supporting individuals who are or have been incarcerated, and serving on the production team of the Boston Art & Music Soul Festival (BAMS Fest).

Originally from Hackensack, NJ, tamia received her BA in Government (American Politics) and African American Studies from the University of Virginia and her M.Ed. in Higher Education Student Affairs Administration from the University of Vermont. 

Also important to note, tamia cannot live without the ocean, all the folx who call her auntie, traveling to countries below the equator, kitty cats, and music.

 

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