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  • tamia jordan

From They Are We


If I return home without my soul, it's because I left my soul in Africa. I'm not afraid of that.

"Materially, they don't have much, but spiritually this is perhaps the richest place that i have ever been able to experience." 


Summary from IMDB: Can a family separated by the transatlantic slave trade sing and dance its way back together? In Perico, Cuba is an Afro-Cuban group that has kept alive songs and dances brought aboard a slave ship by their ancestor, known only as Josefa. They preserved them proudly despite slavery, poverty and repression. Through years of searching, filmmaker Emma Christopher tried to find their origins. Then, in a remote village in Sierra Leone, people watched a recording of the Cubans' songs and dances, joyously declared 'They are We!' and joined in with the songs. They had never forgotten their lost family, and now their descendants were coming home. So began preparations for the biggest festival in the village's history, a welcoming home for their cousins.

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About Me

tamia rashima jordan, M.Ed., channels her energy into projects that heal the BIPOC (Black & Indigenous & People of Color) community including serving on the Community Council of the Massachusetts Coalition to Prevent Gun Violence, supporting individuals who are or have been incarcerated, and serving on the production team of the Boston Art & Music Soul Festival (BAMS Fest).

Originally from Hackensack, NJ, tamia received her BA in Government (American Politics) and African American Studies from the University of Virginia and her M.Ed. in Higher Education Student Affairs Administration from the University of Vermont. 

Also important to note, tamia cannot live without the ocean, all the folx who call her auntie, traveling to countries below the equator, kitty cats, and music.

 

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